It's Not About the Money

One of the commonest reasons cited for scepticism of psi is this: Why do psychics never win the lottery?

Last night I picked up a favourite read, José Silva's The Silva Mind Control Method, which describes creative visualizing techniques in admirably pragmatic non-New Agey terms. 

In chapter seven Silva talks about how he investigated the possible usefulness of dreams in problem-solving. He'd been studying Freud, Adler and Jung for some years, but these worthies didn't seem to agree about what dreams were for and he started to think he was wasting his time.  Late one night he got fed up and resolved to drop the whole thing. He goes on:

About two hours later I was awakened by a dream. It was not a series of events, like most dreams, but simply a light. My field of dream vision was filled with midday sunlight, gold, very bright. I opened my eyes and it was dark in my shadowy bedroom. I closed my eyes and it was bright again. I repeated several times: eyes open, dark; eyes closed, bright. About the third or fourth time my eyes were closed I saw three numbers: 3-7-3. Then another set of numbers: 3-4-3. The next time the first set came back, and the time after that the second set.

I was less interested in the six numbers than in the light, which began to fade little by little. I wondered if life came to an end, like an electric bulb, in a sudden flash of light. When I realized I was not dying I wanted to bring the light back to study it. I changed my breathing, my position in bed, my level of mind; nothing worked. It continued to fade. Altogether, the light lasted about five minutes.

Perhaps the numbers had a meaning. I lay awake the rest of the night trying to recall telephone numbers, addresses, license numbers-anything that might give meaning to those numbers. 

The next day, tired as he was after only two hours sleep, he kept trying to connect the numbers to something he already knew. Towards the end of the day his wife sent him out to shop for a particular item, which involved crossing the border to the Mexican side of town. While discussing his dream with a friend, it occurred to him that what he had seen might have been a lottery ticket number. The headquarters of the Mexican lottery was closing up, but by chance later they found a vendor selling that very ticket. He bought it and weeks later learned that he'd won $10,000, which he sorely needed.

From time to time I come across other similar cases, usually where the number comes unbidden in a dream, and turns out to correspond to a winning horse or something of the sort. Even so, it's probably still true to say that psychics don't win the lottery. Nor do they get rich in casinos. Apparently it's not something that you can just switch on.

This mystifies sceptics, but it's not so strange if you recognize the spiritual hinterground to psi.  It doesn't flourish if the purpose is merely private material gain.  This is what Silva says about his experience:

As elated as I was, I looked this gift horse carefully in the mouth, and what I found was more valuable by far than the gift itself. It was foundation is solidly based conviction that my studies were worthwhile. Somehow I had made contact with higher intelligence. Maybe I had made contact with it many times before not known; this time I knew.

Silva subsequently got rich by formulating his ideas in a best-selling book and a teaching course.  But if that helped a lot of people achieve personal fulfilment and spiritual growth, then you could argue it was deserved.  It's not about the money.


It's Not About the Money

One of the commonest reasons cited for scepticism of psi is this: Why do psychics never win the lottery?

Last night I picked up a favourite read, José Silva's The Silva Mind Control Method, which describes creative visualizing techniques in admirably pragmatic non-New Agey terms. 

In chapter seven Silva talks about how he investigated the possible usefulness of dreams in problem-solving. He'd been studying Freud, Adler and Jung for some years, but these worthies didn't seem to agree about what dreams were for and he started to think he was wasting his time.  Late one night he got fed up and resolved to drop the whole thing. He goes on:

About two hours later I was awakened by a dream. It was not a series of events, like most dreams, but simply a light. My field of dream vision was filled with midday sunlight, gold, very bright. I opened my eyes and it was dark in my shadowy bedroom. I closed my eyes and it was bright again. I repeated several times: eyes open, dark; eyes closed, bright. About the third or fourth time my eyes were closed I saw three numbers: 3-7-3. Then another set of numbers: 3-4-3. The next time the first set came back, and the time after that the second set.

I was less interested in the six numbers than in the light, which began to fade little by little. I wondered if life came to an end, like an electric bulb, in a sudden flash of light. When I realized I was not dying I wanted to bring the light back to study it. I changed my breathing, my position in bed, my level of mind; nothing worked. It continued to fade. Altogether, the light lasted about five minutes.

Perhaps the numbers had a meaning. I lay awake the rest of the night trying to recall telephone numbers, addresses, license numbers-anything that might give meaning to those numbers. 

The next day, tired as he was after only two hours sleep, he kept trying to connect the numbers to something he already knew. Towards the end of the day his wife sent him out to shop for a particular item, which involved crossing the border to the Mexican side of town. While discussing his dream with a friend, it occurred to him that what he had seen might have been a lottery ticket number. The headquarters of the Mexican lottery was closing up, but by chance later they found a vendor selling that very ticket. He bought it and weeks later learned that he'd won $10,000, which he sorely needed.

From time to time I come across other similar cases, usually where the number comes unbidden in a dream, and turns out to correspond to a winning horse or something of the sort. Even so, it's probably still true to say that psychics don't win the lottery. Nor do they get rich in casinos. Apparently it's not something that you can just switch on.

This mystifies sceptics, but it's not so strange if you recognize the spiritual hinterground to psi.  It doesn't flourish if the purpose is merely private material gain.  This is what Silva says about his experience:

As elated as I was, I looked this gift horse carefully in the mouth, and what I found was more valuable by far than the gift itself. It was foundation is solidly based conviction that my studies were worthwhile. Somehow I had made contact with higher intelligence. Maybe I had made contact with it many times before not known; this time I knew.

Silva subsequently got rich by formulating his ideas in a best-selling book and a teaching course.  But if that helped a lot of people achieve personal fulfilment and spiritual growth, then you could argue it was deserved.  It's not about the money.


It's Not About the Money

One of the commonest reasons cited for scepticism of psi is this: Why do psychics never win the lottery?

Last night I picked up a favourite read, José Silva's The Silva Mind Control Method, which describes creative visualizing techniques in admirably pragmatic non-New Agey terms. 

In chapter seven Silva talks about how he investigated the possible usefulness of dreams in problem-solving. He'd been studying Freud, Adler and Jung for some years, but these worthies didn't seem to agree about what dreams were for and he started to think he was wasting his time.  Late one night he got fed up and resolved to drop the whole thing. He goes on:

About two hours later I was awakened by a dream. It was not a series of events, like most dreams, but simply a light. My field of dream vision was filled with midday sunlight, gold, very bright. I opened my eyes and it was dark in my shadowy bedroom. I closed my eyes and it was bright again. I repeated several times: eyes open, dark; eyes closed, bright. About the third or fourth time my eyes were closed I saw three numbers: 3-7-3. Then another set of numbers: 3-4-3. The next time the first set came back, and the time after that the second set.

I was less interested in the six numbers than in the light, which began to fade little by little. I wondered if life came to an end, like an electric bulb, in a sudden flash of light. When I realized I was not dying I wanted to bring the light back to study it. I changed my breathing, my position in bed, my level of mind; nothing worked. It continued to fade. Altogether, the light lasted about five minutes.

Perhaps the numbers had a meaning. I lay awake the rest of the night trying to recall telephone numbers, addresses, license numbers-anything that might give meaning to those numbers. 

The next day, tired as he was after only two hours sleep, he kept trying to connect the numbers to something he already knew. Towards the end of the day his wife sent him out to shop for a particular item, which involved crossing the border to the Mexican side of town. While discussing his dream with a friend, it occurred to him that what he had seen might have been a lottery ticket number. The headquarters of the Mexican lottery was closing up, but by chance later they found a vendor selling that very ticket. He bought it and weeks later learned that he'd won $10,000, which he sorely needed.

From time to time I come across other similar cases, usually where the number comes unbidden in a dream, and turns out to correspond to a winning horse or something of the sort. Even so, it's probably still true to say that psychics don't win the lottery. Nor do they get rich in casinos. Apparently it's not something that you can just switch on.

This mystifies sceptics, but it's not so strange if you recognize the spiritual hinterground to psi.  It doesn't flourish if the purpose is merely private material gain.  This is what Silva says about his experience:

As elated as I was, I looked this gift horse carefully in the mouth, and what I found was more valuable by far than the gift itself. It was foundation is solidly based conviction that my studies were worthwhile. Somehow I had made contact with higher intelligence. Maybe I had made contact with it many times before not known; this time I knew.

Silva subsequently got rich by formulating his ideas in a best-selling book and a teaching course.  But if that helped a lot of people achieve personal fulfilment and spiritual growth, then you could argue it was deserved.  It's not about the money.